Bush Walking/ Hiking – East Cloudy Head

I mentioned in my post about the Labillardiere Peninsula how to get to Bruny Island and a map of the island.

 

On day two I trudged up to East Cloudy Head.

To get to Cloudy Bay, follow Cloudy Bay Road from Lunawanna. There is camping available both at the start of the trek (near the beach), and also a campground accessed via four wheel drive at the end of the beach.

I parked my ute at the day use car park and walked the 3km length of the beach as well.

Beach looking west & south to East Cloudy Head

Beach looking west & south to East Cloudy Head. Sadly, north does not get a mention…

It’s an amazing 3km stretch of beach.

Beach Views south and west

Beach Views south and west

 

Don't go here.

Don’t go here.

When you get toward the end, don’t go up here unless you want to see people camping.

If you do, that’s fine… but you may be a little weird. You can always make your way back toward the beach and find the trail.

Trail this way

Trail this way

It starts here

 

Trudge this way

Trudge this way

And goes this way. There is a registration book to fill in.

 

The trail is very easy to follow. You trudge up the western side of the head, cross over the back and then ascend from the east. The undergrowth on the eastern side is quite thick, so if you’re like me & wore shorts, your legs will get a bit scratched.

?

View south on the way up

?

The trail

?

View south and west on the way up

?

View west

?

View back to the beach

I didn’t see any wildlife on the trudge, which was a bit unusual. There was one moment where a large beast took off through the undergrowth, which startled me (and the lady on the trail behind me). Luckily we both recovered.

?

View east from the eastern side of the trail

?

The thingy at the top

?

View south and west from the top

?

View west from the top

?

View north and west back to the beach

?

View east again on the way down

The views as you ascend & then reach the summit are just magnificent.

Retrace your steps back to wherever you parked.

 

The official paraphernalia lists the walk as anywhere between 12 and 15km. My GPS says I walked 14.46km. I walked for three hours and fifteen minutes, including a stop at the top.

Here’s a link to my Endomondo workout.

 

Thanks for reading

Pete

Cape Bruny Lighthouse

I mentioned in my post about the Labillardiere Peninsula how to get to Bruny Island, so have a look at that if you want directions.

A visit to the lighthouse is a must if you’re on South Bruny.

 

I’ll let the pictures tell the story.

 

Drive this way to the lighthouse

Drive this way to the lighthouse

?

Walk up here

The tale of the lighthouse

The tale of the lighthouse

 

Courts Island

Courts Island

View south

View south

?

the old and the new

?

Tall, tower-like structure

View south east

View south east

View north

View north

View west

View west

?

View south, with the lighthouse & outbuilding in the way

?

Lighthouse

?

Lighthouse again

?

View East to new solar powered light

View further east

View north east

Thanks for reading!

Pete

Bush Walking/ Hiking – Bruny Island – Labillardiere Peninsula

On Monday and Tuesday of this week I went to beautiful Bruny Island to do some trudging about.

For more info on Bruny and how to get there, I’ll leave you to check out this link.

But to summarise… From Hobart drive about 30km south along the Channel Highway to a nice little town called Kettering… at Kettering follow the signs to the Bruny Island Ferry.

Yes, it’s an island, you will need to cross water to get there. During summer the waits for the ferry can be quite long, so they’ve put another ferry on to work during the busy periods. The ferry people do an amazing job of ferrying (pun intended) everyone on and across as quickly as possible.

Quite a few roads on the island itself are bitumen; but the further south you go, dirt/ gravel is predominant. Don’t be put off taking your new Audi A3 to the island, as most of the roads are perfectly suitable to 2-wheel drive ‘normal’ cars.

Here is a map…

Bruny Island

Bruny Island

The first trudge I did was the Labillardiere Peninsula Circuit. ‘Labillardiere’ of course is a French word meaning ‘really long trudge’. The official trail map actually says it is named after a botanist whose name was La Billardiere, but I’m going with my translation.

The circuit is within South Bruny National Park, which means park entry fees apply. Check out Tasmania’s Parks & Wildlife site for more info. Access is from the Jetty Beach Campground.

If you want to do the circuit in a day and return to ‘mainland’ Tasmania, get to the island early. The ferry does not run at night…

So, where were we? Oh yeah, the walk.

Drive this way to the campground

Drive this way to the campground

I found it was best to get to the campground in the middle of the day… because everyone from the night before has already left… and the people who want to camp here are yet to arrive…!

You may notice in the sign above that the Bruny Lighthouse is close by. Make sure you go there, the views are magnificent. I went on Tuesday morning. I’ll pop up pictures in another post.

Campground

Campground

 

Glamping?

Glamping?

Campground with walking track entry in the background

Campground with walking track entry in the background

 

The campground

 

Start here

Start here

From the campground, it’s best to do the circuit clockwise from here.

Don't forget to register

Don’t forget to register

There’s a shorter trail called Luggaboine Circuit to do if you don’t want to tackle the longer walk.

 

Trudge this way...

Trudge this way…

Some of the view

Some of the view

 

The trail begins as a disused four wheel drive track for a fair distance. You trudge mainly north and west for the trip outwards.

 

Here be dragons

Here be dragons

I got to this rocky beach opposite Hen & Chicken Rocks (yes, they’re really called that…), and thought: “What a nice place to stop & have a sandwich”. But the copperhead snake that was sunning itself on the rocks put me off. (You can’t see the snake in the picture, it fled in terror at my approach. And as always regarding snakes, when I say ‘fled in terror’, I mean it slithered away in a condescending manner).

The walk is well-signed and easy to navigate. The only concern at times is that the undergrowth is so thick that you can’t always see what you’re treading on (see my comments about the snake earlier). Proceed with care in these spots.

The trail isn’t very steep, although you do trudge up Mount Bleak, which is really just a small hill.

 

Partridge Island

Partridge Island

 

Hopwood Beach

Hopwood Beach

Eventually as you walk north and west the land will run out, and you will get to the first of several beaches. This is called Hopwood Beach’, about the halfway point of the trudge, opposite Partridge Island. I admit, I was moderately disappointed that the Partridge Family were not there.

 

Trudge this way

Trudge this way

The trail will now turn back to the south and east and you trudge back toward the campsite. From here the trail varies between a more traditional bush trail and beach crossings. The beaches are magnificent… unused and un-spoilt.

The end (or start if you go anti-clockwise)

The end (or start if you go anti-clockwise)

Follow the trail back to the campground. Afterwards, have a swim or paddle in the beach… the water is cool, but it’s a great way to soothe the feet after such a long trudge.

 

The official paraphernalia lists the walk as anywhere between 15 and 20km. My GPS says I walked 19.3km. I walked for four and a half hours, but I didn’t take any breaks to eat or have a dip in the water along the way.

Here’s a link to my Endomondo workout.

 

Thanks for reading

 

Pete